“Brian sat with me in the loo and we sang the Beatles “All You Need Is Love” for a while. Definitely a high point!!”

“Brian sat with me in the loo and we sang the Beatles “All You Need Is Love” for a while. Definitely a high point!!”

You are right it is difficult to talk about a lovely birth experience with people who have not had things go according to plan. Maybe that is why there are so many negative stories being thrown around…
So… Our story…
I won’t pretend it wasn’t hard but for me it was more of a mental challenge than a physical one. I was ‘due’ on the 5th of May and I elected to have a sweep at 41 weeks. It did the trick and I started having regular surges that afternoon. The afternoon and evening were spent with surges about 30 minutes apart. I went to bed early and the next morning we considered whether Brian should go to work. I quickly decided probably not!!
As the morning turned into afternoon things started feeling more serious. I relaxed with a couple of baths and Brian sat with me in the loo and we sang the Beatles “All You Need Is Love” for a while. Definitely a high point!!
I decided to move around a bit and things started to ramp up. I made Brian phone the midwife to come check around 2pm. I was only 2cm dilated which was hard not to be discouraged about but I felt better knowing that at least I hadn’t gone to hospital to find out I had to be sent home!!
My midwife advised me to find a comfortable place as it would probably be a while. So I set up camp on our bed and then things all went very quickly. 
I definitely went to a really dark place for a bit and asked Brian to tell me nice stories to distract me. He told me about trips we’ve taken together and places we would go in the future with our daughter. It was really helpful. He was a constant beacon of calm and really helped me get me body to relax between surges. I was so shaky and sick it was difficult to be still and allow my body to rest between surges. It was so exhausting but having Brian there to remind me to relax was brilliant. I think I only really lost my cool once during transition when I shouted a few expletives about the TENS machine. 
Brian is SO calm in his manner that I don’t think the midwives really believed him when he called them around midnight saying it was time for them to come back. They took an hour to show up, by which point I was pretty much just trying not to push and warning Brian that he might have to catch Lina! Fortunately that didn’t happen and I delivered her in the pool about an hour after the midwives arrived. She was snoozy when she came out and has been a snoozy lady ever since. Loves her naps!!
I lost about 500ml of blood after delivering the placenta which meant I was a little incapacitated while they checked Lina and cleared everything away. They gave me the option of going to hospital or staying here and monitoring me in the morning. I was not about to go to hospital after a successful home birth!!! I had a couple of stitches and was thrilled to finally have some local anaesthetic! I had to laugh because it was only when I had the stitches that they offered me has and air, and when I said yes they had to go get it out of the car. Ha! Way to be prepared. 
The first thing I said to Brian was ‘Lina will be an only child because I’m never doing that again!’ I might not stick to that but it was definitely the hardest thing I’ve ever done!! So empowering and amazing though.
It was an amazing thing to hear the dawn chorus in our own bed with our lovely Lina Bird in our arms though and adrenaline is some pretty powerful stuff!
Thanks for asking how it went. I realise I haven’t really written this down so it was nice to think about it again. Photos of Lina attached. One just after she was born and one a few days ago. 
Hope all is well with you! Would be nice to introduce you sometime soon. 
Xx

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